Monthly Archives: September 2017

What are the ‘milk’ choices that suit bowel function?

Many people are unsure whether or not they are better off using dairy milk or a dairy alternative. A number of options exist now with more appearing all the time. Dairy milk provides a range of nutrients that other non-dairy milks do not have. Many products add vitamins and minerals to improve the nutrient profile of their product and many don’t so don’t assume you are getting an alternative with a similar nutrient profile.

As a general rule if you are not opposed to drinking dairy milk there are significant nutritional benefits to doing so and lactose-free milk and yoghurt are readily available. There is negligible lactose in hard/yellow cheese such as chedder or parmesan so these can be eaten by those who consider themselves lactose-intolerant.

Lactose-free dairy milk is regular dairy milk with the lactose pre-split by added lactase enzyme so you don’t have to do this in your gut making for easy digestion of this milk. Lactose-free milk meets the digestibility requirement for the low FODMAP diet.

For those who prefer a non-dairy milk there are a range of options that will also meet these digestibility criteria at the serve size listed below though each differs in terms of nutrients like protein and calcium. Take a look at the nutrients per 100 gm on the nutrition information panel and compare the milks you are interested in so you can choose the one with the higher protein and calcium values.

Soy milk made from Soy protein, not whole soy bean  – 250 ml

Almond milk – 250 ml

Coconut milk(UHT) – 125 ml

Macadamia Milk – 250 ml

Oat milk – 30 ml

Quinoa milk – 250 ml

Rice milk-200 ml

Compare the nutrient information for each in the nutrients per 100 gm column on the label to determine how your choice stacks up compared with dairy milk. You may also be surprised at the long list of ingredients on the label of the dairy alternatives that are needed to make these products similar in texture and look to dairy milk.

Some people report that they find A2 milk more digestible than regular milk however it does not meet the digestibility levels required for inclusion on low FODMAP diet lists.