Monthly Archives: June 2016

‘Heartburn’ a.k.a. Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GORD)

Once we swallow food/fluids they passes down our throat/oesophagus and through a valve/sphincter to the stomach where it mixes with acid stomach digestive juices. If some of the stomach contents flow back into the throat/oesophagus and results in a burning sensation in the throat. If this happens regularly the lining of the throat becomes inflamed.

If it is just occasional then an antacid can be used to relieve the condition but if you are regularly reaching for the antacids it is time to get some help as long-term this condition has some serious consequences. If you are pregnant it is a special case where the baby can push your stomach contents higher and into the oesophagus so see your GP.

Help comes in the form of :

  • Dietary change to reduce meal size and make it more easily digestible until the inflammation subsides- temporarily lowering fat intake in particular is important as well as minimising alcohol, chocolate and coffee intake.
  • avoiding peppermint flavoured sweets/gum/tea etc as this relaxes the oesophageal sphincter more.
  • managing anxiety if your symptoms are worse duet to this.
  • Sleeping with your head/neck elevated to reduce ‘back-wash’ to the oesophagus.
  • possibly medication to assist till symptoms reside as the inflammation reduces
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  • Reducing/Quitting Smoking and losing weight if overweight is also be very helpful.

An Accredited Practising Dietitian can get you started on the road to increased comfort.

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Gastritis

Gastritis is the name given to the inflammation of the stomach lining and is a very common condition.In some cases there may be no symptoms and people find out they have it after a routine biopsy. In most cases though individuals are aware of pain in the upper abdomen, nausea, indigestion and loss of appetite and at times vomiting.

Gastritis can be caused by a variety of factors including:

  • regular taking of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications
  • a bacterial infection called Helicobacter pylori
  • excess/regular alcohol or coffee
  • protracted vomiting
  • when there is an overproduction of gastric juices

It can be that people notice this when they are stressed or anxious as for some this is the time they will have some excess gastric juice production.

Treatment for this condition may include medication to reduce the gastric juice production or treat helicobacter infection if present. Reducing alcohol and coffee intake will usually help and for some the introduction of a temporary low fat, easy to digest diet will result in the required relief. Talk to a GP and an Accredited Practicing Dietitian about resolving your condition.

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What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a condition where a set of symptoms, including abdominal bloating and pain, wind and altered bowel movements affect sufferers’ lives. It is a common condition affecting up to 15% of the general population and is called a Functional Gastrointestinal Disorder. This means that the nerves and muscles of the gut may not be working in combination optimally causing digestive upset and bowel issues.

Depending on your symptoms a diagnosis of IBS is best made after other, more serious conditions, are excluded. Some tests organised by your GP or a Gastroenterologists can help to rule out Helicobacter Infection, Coeliac Disease, Diverticular Disease to name a few of the organic gut disorders .

Getting some control back over your bowel symptoms will mean you can spend more time on the fun things in life and less time in the bathroom! This is where a change in some aspects of your diet including some difficult to digest/absorb foods, food volume and timing can help. It is best done in an organised manner to ensure that the minimum number of restrictions results and the maximum amount of comfort.

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Diet for Digestion-the internet version of dietary restrictions-help!

An internet search for a few minutes on the topic of digestive health suggests your diet is to blame for many of your gut symptoms. The list below shows some of the common food and drink items that are to blame, according to ‘Dr Google”. The internet is a wonderful source of information and mis-information and the dietary restrictions list below came from my brief search on this topic.

Excluding coffee, tea, alcohol, fibre, meat, soy, carbohydrate, dairy/lactose, honey, fruit/fructose, wheat, rye, yeast, legumes, onion, garlic, sugar,processed foods, artificial sweeteners are general results.

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Many people with digestive symptoms start omitting one food or group of foods and when symptoms don’t improve they omit another food group and so on until their diet includes a very small range of foods. Eating such a small range of foods makes meals repetitive and not very enjoyable. Nutrient needs will not be met and over time health deteriorates further.

Is there another way to ease digestive distress?

Yes, get an organised diagnosis plan to exclude underlying disorders and take it from there. An Accredited Practising Dietitian(APD) with a digestion interest will help you put this together and work out which dietary restrictions may be required to manage your symptoms and for how long the restrictions should be followed. If you live in Perth come contact me for an appointment or

 

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